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Compression Wraps / Compression Bandages

Compression bandages are bandages that usually feature a certain amount of elasticity to provide the user with controlled compression. A compression bandage prevents swelling and supports injured or sprained body areas. It can compress a new injury or an inflamed area in order to prevent the area from becoming swollen. A compression wrap can also alleviate swelling, and prevent it from increasing. Browse the extensive selection of the best compression bandages at AvaCare Medical now! Read More...

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  1. Nonsterile Self-Adherent Cohesive Wraps
    Nonsterile Self-Adherent Cohesive Wraps
    Starting at $1.63
  2. Firm-Wrap Short Stretch Bandages,Beige
    Firm-Wrap Short Stretch Bandages,Beige
    Starting at $3.09
  3. Swift-Wrap Sterile Elastic Bandages, White
  4. McKesson Performance Esmark Compression Bandage
  5. McKesson 2 Layer Compression Bandage System
    McKesson 2 Layer Compression Bandage System
    Starting at $14.05
  6. Econo-Wrap LF Elastic Bandage
    Econo-Wrap LF Elastic Bandage
    Starting at $0.51
  7. REB LF Elastic Bandage
    REB LF Elastic Bandage
    Starting at $2.66
  8. Dynarex Elastic Bandage
    Dynarex Elastic Bandage
    Starting at $0.70
  9. Curity Elastic Bandage w Removable Clip
    Curity Elastic Bandage w Removable Clip
    Starting at $1.42
  10. Curity Unna Boot with Calamine
    Curity Unna Boot with Calamine
    Starting at $9.50
  11. JOBST Compri2 Lite 2 Layer Compression Bandage System
  12. JOBST Compri2 2 Layer Compression Bandage System

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Are Compression Bandages Elastic?

Elastic compression bandages have inherent elasticity - a certain amount of stretch, in other words - which enables them to provide controlled compression. There are exclusions to this rule though; for instance, Flannel wraps do not have any elasticity. 

Types of Compression Bandages

There are many different types of compression bandages or wraps. Self-adherent or cohesive compression bandages (which don’t require tape for use), Ace Wraps, Short-stretch bandages, Flannel wraps, most elastic or long stretch bandages, inelastic or short stretch bandages, and tubular bandages such as Unna boots are some common examples. 

Choosing a Compression Wrap

The rule of thumb when it comes to choosing a compression wrap or bandage is the following: The smaller the limb circumference is, the greater the bandage tension will be. What stands to reason therefore is that a larger limb will need a more compressive bandage in order to achieve the same compression level that an average-sized limb would require with a less compressive bandage. Circumference of the limb is measured with the system of ABPI (Ankle Brachial Pressure Index). 

Sizes of Compression Bandages

Standard sized compression bandages will measure between 2 and 6 inches wide. A three or four inch-wide compression bandage is the advised size to choose for wrapping an adult leg or arm. A two inch bandage is more suitable for a child’s arm or leg, or for an adult’s finger. Note that the wider the bandage measures, the more compression you’ll be able to experience without inhibiting blood circulation. 

Tips for Using a Compression Wrap

If you’re using a compression wrap, the most important tip we can offer you is to follow the recommendations of your doctor when it comes to applying your compression bandage and using it overall. Aside from that, here are a couple of tips that you may find helpful to know about using compression bandages! 

An injury should only be compressed for a limited amount of time. Increased blood flow to the area will promote healing. Be sure to follow your MD’s advice about how long to keep the compression bandage on for. Ice should never be applied simultaneously with compression, since joining the two together at the same time can result in frostbite. Be careful not to wrap the bandage too tightly; that can result in poor blood circulation. If the wrapped area feels tingly or numb, or is turning purple or blue, loosen it immediately. If you’ll be using the compression bandage overnight, try to loosen the wrap before you go to sleep.

Levels of Compression

Compression bandages offer different levels of compression. There are light, moderate, high, and even extra high compression bandages to choose from depending on your needs. Read on to find out which level of compression is applicable for your condition. 

Light Compression Bandages

Light compression bandages afford low pressure to small or average-sized limbs. These bandages feature up to 20 mmHg of pressure. Such compression bandages can be used to relieve minor to mild varicose veins, spider veins, as well as to soothe tired legs and alleviate minor swelling. Individuals sometimes also use these while traveling, since long flights and long rides often cause leg swelling (which is referred to as Economy Class Syndrome). They are also used by individuals who have swelling that is due to diabetes. 

Moderate Compression Bandages

Moderate compression bandages are used for what is termed firm compression. These compression bandages are more compressive than light compression bandages: They offer from 20 to 30 mmHg of compression; 10 mmHgs higher than light compression bandages. Aside from being able to be used for mild or regular varicose veins, they can also be used to prevent or relieve ulcers,mild edema, and orthostatic hypotension (which manifests itself in an abrupt drop in blood pressure while the person is in a standing position). 

High Compression Bandages

High compression bandages are used for acute leg or ankle swelling, gross varicose veins, and chronic or post-thrombotic venous Insufficiency. They are also the ideal choice for serious edema and leg ulcers. These offer from 30 to 40mmHg of compression. An example of such a bandage would be the SurePress High Compression Bandage Wrap, the Coban 2 Compression Bandage, or the TensoPress Compression Bandage. 

Extra-High Performance Compression Bandages

These are used to treat limbs that have become enlarged due to edema and therefore require an even higher level of compression than standard high compression bandages. It is also used to treat post-thrombotic or chronic venous insufficiency. This level of compression should never be utilized without guidance from a qualified medical professional since the high pressure will very often reduce blood supply in the area. 

 

Light Compression

8-19 mmHg

Moderate Compression

20-29 mmHg

High Compression

30-39 mmHg

Extra-High Compression

40-50 mmHg

Edema

Edema

Edema

Edema

Economy Class Syndrome DVT

Orthostatic Hypotension

Venous Insufficiency

Venous Insufficiency

Diabetes

Dysautonomia (POTS)

Dysautonomia (POTS)

Snake bite

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

 

Aching or tired legs

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS)

Venous Stasis Ulcer

 

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS)

May-Thurner Syndrome (MTS)

May-Thurner Syndrome (MTS)

 

Spider Veins

Orthostatic Hypotension

Orthostatic Hypotension

 

Sprains

Post-Surgical

Post-Surgical

 

Swelling

Swelling

Swelling

 

Varicose Veins

Varicose Veins

Varicose Veins

 

Pregnancy

Pregnancy

Lymphedema

 

Used in post-sclerotherapy

Lymphedema

Superficial Thrombophlebitis

 

 

Elastic Compression Bandage Uses

There are many uses for compression bandages. Most of the aforementioned uses for compression bandages are intended for legs, but aside from those, there are also many other ways to use compression bandages. You can use such a bandage as a shoulder compression bandage, a compression bandage for hips, or even a snake bite compression bandage. 

First aid compression bandages such as foam compression wraps are a standard component of any typical first aid kit. Emergency compression bandages have such a variety of uses; that’s what makes them a first aid essential. Other uses for compression bandages include for bleeding and for swelling. 

Whether you fractured your knee, have had knee surgery, or have arthritis, a compression bandage can be useful. If you suffered a strain or sprain, that would also be a reason to try a compression bandage. 

You may need a compression bandage for an amputation or simply for swelling, you may be required to wear a sterile compression bandage after surgery, or perhaps you need a keloid or calamine compression wrap.

 

Are you looking to buy compression bandages? Whatever your reason for choosing a compression bandage, you can find one at AvaCare Medical. Our selection includes choices from top brands: Coban Lite Compression Bandages, and many other Coban or even Medline Compression Wraps are popular options, and SurePress Compression Wraps are too. Shop compression bandages at great prices now!